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real trouble just doing basic run of the mill governing stuff. bills failing unexpectedly and needing to be pulled at the last minute and tried again. the republican leadership's own legislation failing to get enough republican votes to pass. and that happening in public because they couldn't count it properly in private? they did get better at all the symbolic stuff that does not have real world consequences. they may not have been able to find their way through the constitution on the first day in the majority. but they did figure out how to fake symbolically repeal obama care 33 separate times. it didn't mean anything, but when there were things that didn't mean anything that were just symbolic, ultimately they figured out that they could get some of that stuff done. but when things really did matter, like in the debt ceiling standoff, when the republicans decided to block something they happily voted for dozens of times under republican presidents, they did end up having to vote to raise the debt ceiling, but not before they pushed the fight so far and so late that the nation's bo
. let me start with this. i have a message for the tea party members everywhere, destroying government is not good politics. you are engaged in negative politics. you are acting against the majority rule right now. you are trying to bring down the majority government by obstruction. people will remember. whot won tax relief. people who believe in government will remember. the people who believe in national defense and social security and medicare will remember. they will know which party is trying to destroy working democracy in order to pursue its political ends. they will know who listens to the voter, who respects the voter, and who thumbs his nose at the voter and that ladies and gentlemen of the tea party right is you. we go over this cliff and you will not have to ask for whom the bell tolls, it willing tolling for you. leading off tonight josh green and chris frats of national journal. you don't have to be as clear as i, but try, gentlemen, tonight. it looks to me like one party, guns again it's asymmetric. both parties are not screwing around, one is. is that true? >> i think b
who captured. what they campaigned against was spending money on government, that is what taxes are. got it? and that's hardball for now, thanks for being with us "the ed show" with ed schultz starts right now. >>> good evening, americans, welcome to the ed show. i'm michael eric dyson in for ed schultz. the president cuts his vacation short to come back to washington, d.c., meanwhile, house republicans are literally phoning it in, this is the ed show, and as ed would say, let's get to work. >> this is something within our capacity to solve. it doesn't take that much work, we just have to do the right thing. >> six days away from the fiscal cliff and there are real consequences to millions of americans if no deal is cut. congressman elijah cummings and ryan grim of the huffington post are here with the latest. a tea party giant stages a coupe with his own office. the details on dick armey's hostile takeover. the nra is catching heat from all directions. >> i don't think the nra is listening, i don't think they understand. >> georgetown university law professor, david cole on the gro
can move forward? >> well, first of all, we have to be able to govern. we have to have an adult conversation, getting people in the room who actually want to solve this problem. and i think it's very important to step back and see the fact that we have already -- there are three parts of this deficit reduction stool. we've already in the past two years passed $1.6 trillion in spending cuts. we've passed over $700 billion in savings in medicare through reforms like cutting back on overpayments to insurance companies. the one piece of this puzzle that we've not been able to get any support for is making sure that the wealthiest among us help solve this problem by being willing to pay a little bit more to be part of the solution. so we have sent a bill to the house back in july, bipartisan bill that says what -- everybody says they don't want middle-class families to have their taxes go up, well, fine. why don't we start with something we can agree on, which is that? and just pass that. why doesn't the house just pass that? but as we know, the speaker couldn't even pass his own pla
a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former la
't have a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former labor secretary, robert reich, and amanda turco of "the huffington post." >>> then, chicago reaches the tragic milestone of 500 homicides in 2012. reverend jesse jackson will join me to discuss curbing gun violence in our cities. we'll be right back. >>> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thinning. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is t
that has been taken up by our unfunded government programs. that is the number one cause of our fiscal and debt problem and it's not going away. so it looks like 2013 is going to be real. it's going to be dealing with issues of peace and war, national identity and issues of personal security. you think it's not important? say it and you're part of the problem. and that's "hardball" for now. th thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the gop is in denial and they're scrambling to make a deal. the only problem? they still haven't learned that they're going to have to compromise. just hours ago, president obama returned home from christmas vacation. looking to jump start negotiations and protect millions from seeing their taxes go up. the news comes after a conference call that mr. boehner held with gop house members, telling them to return to washington this sunday. but just because they're coming back doesn't mean they're looking to play nice. today, senator harry reid blasted the s
into if you let the government default or whatever goes on this weekend, because basically defense spending will be cut and we'll have new payroll taxes and all tax rates will go up on income tax and estate taxes and all the bad stuff will happen, and how that's good politics. >> look, politicians are creatures of narrow self-interest. from the self-interested standpoint of a republican house member from a safe district who fears a primary challenge, yes, it's better for them to wait three days, cast -- go over the cliff, cast a vote to cut taxes and basically screw all the people who are going to be affected by it preserving their own jobs than it is to agree to a tax increase now and risk the wrath of the tea party right two years from now. >> chris, let me ask you about another possible, i hope it doesn't happen. next tuesday or next wednesday when the market reopens on january 2nd and they fully realize at that point that this cliff has been gone over and the congress has failed to meet its own targets which it set itself when it set this cliff up, who will pay the price if, say, the ma
and there will also be spending cuts to government programs as well as the military and that will be spread over with 2013 and the world doesn't come to an end if we go over this quote, unquote, fiscal cliff and instead, a lot of the damage gets spread out and congress does have the power to go back and fix things. >> is it more important that the payroll tax holiday will go away and that is another thing that will end up happening. >> the payroll tax holiday will be a temporary sting, and it was crafted in 2010 and that is right in the waning days of the 111th congress when they still held in control the house of representatives and all of the counter proposals and counter proposals, and house speaker john boehner and the offers we have on the table don't deal with the payroll tax holiday and they go up to people on the amount of money they put in the social security trust fund and that is your payroll tax and those will go up and pretty much regardless if we get a deal or we don't. >> mark murray from d.c., breaking it down for us and the senior editor, thank you, sir. >> as lawmakers in d.c.
government agencies are planning no immediate changes because they're anticipating some kind of deal. that leaves the unemployed, extended unemployment insurance will expire immediately if we go over the cliff. a deal later in january could theoretically restore extended benefits, the immediate damage will have already been done. for many people, this is all an interesting charade. but for the unemployed it's the real deal. get your cell phones out, i want to know what you think. tonight's question, who will the public blame if we go over the fiscal cliff? text a for democrats, text b for republicans to 622329. i'll bring you the results later in the show. >>> joining me now is congressman elijah cummings of maryland. welcome to the show. >> it's good to be with you. >> what do you make of the latest posturing. the house will they reconvene before january? they have a lot of stuff to do, so clearly they can't make it back to d.c. to do the people's business. >> as you said a few minutes ago, we have been assured we would be given at least 48 hours notice before we would have to come
serve to, "embarrass the administration, destroy the energy of government, and substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices of an insignificant, turbulent, or corrupt junta to the regular deliberations and decisions of a respectable majority." good writer, that hamilton. but in recent years, the senate has been remade into a super majority constitution. disturb institution. you need 60 votes to get almost anything done. between 2009 and 2010, we had more filibusters than we had in the '50s, '60s, and '70s combined. and they're not filibusters like we think of them, where the senators go to the floor and debate an issue until they keel over from exhaustion. they're just obstruction. if you watch a filibuster today, it doesn't look like anything. it's the blue screen on c-span, the one with the classical music playing over it. you don't tune in to here an intense minority demand a great debate on the issue of the day. you tune in to hear a string quartet. senator jeff merkley, a democrat from oregon is trying to change that. he's got a proposal to force talking filibusters in the senate
and the government runs out of money. >> that's where i feel all the eyes are on capitol hill. saying you can't do this with the fiscal cliff. what a two months that will be. thanks so much for joining us. we appreciate it. joining me here in the studio with our first reads of the day, senior political editor mark murray. welcome. back and forth from the harry reid. we have congressional ping pong going on. you said it is time for house republicans to put middle class families first bypassing the senate's bill to protect 98% of americans on january 1st. the senate bill could pass tomorrow if the house republicans would lead it come to the floor. the house had two bills that collectively can avert the entire fiscal cliff if enacted. those bills await action by the senate. >> the classic ping pong gridlock and no way out. >> it's important to know how far we have come in the last seven days. a week ago we were closer than we had seen before on a particular deal. john boehner made a big concession allowing tax cuts to rise on income over a million dollars. president obama countered with a big concess
for them to be a governing party in any way, particularly in the house of representatives. they are an oppositional party there. but it makes it impossible for john boehner to govern in any effective way to make any sort of negotiation with the president to avoid a fiscal cliff. and the larger issue is that the national populous as a whole wants to see congress get stuff done. they want the accomplishments. so it works for republicans in some statewide races, mostly not but it's not a national agenda. >> allow me to reintroduce myself as a tea party spokesperson. what they say is they are a governing party. you said they're not. they say they are a governing party and they right now are causing the government to completely rewire the way that it deals with the deficit. and they say that there is pain in that process. but the long-term debate and the reason why they don't need to be inside the meeting room is they've got so many of the people in that room afraid of them that we are having a debate between how much to cut the deficit and not to do jobs or stimulus and the th
democrats putting up votes to help make sure that we continue to fund the government, that we actually pay our bills as a government, that we find a balanced approach going forward. john boehner knows the votes from some of the republicans and some of the democrats can happen. and he's been unwilling to do that. >> do you think it's good -- >> it's hurting this country. >> is it good at this point in the process for harry reid to go on the senator floor and bash speaker boehner? does that not send a message this close to the deadline? >> he's trying to make it clear and i'm trying to make it clear that john boehner can't just say i'm not in there. of course, he is a player in this. if he does not work with the senate, work with the president and, again, the president has time and time again said we have some common ground here. if the republicans do agree, and they say they do, that they do not want to see tax rates go up on the american people, well, the president said let's make sure that we vote on that. 98% of americans can be protected from a tax increase. we can protect seniors under
enemies than ever and needs america's backing. but at the same time this israeli government is so spoiled and has shift sod far to the right it makes no effort to take u.s. interest into account. and i agree with that. when netanyahu moved and cut off any chance of a united west bank government, he basically took a step that was completely in the face of u.s. policy going back to george w. bush. >> that's true. i think one of the things to be keep in mind is this pre-nomination process seems to have gotten completely out of control. where congress has too much to say who the presumptive nominees that any president offers forth. over history only 20 cabinet nominees have been knocked back. seven have been rejected and 13 have withdrawn those names. seven of those have happened under the past three administrations. so i think there's something wrong with this whole process where a presumptive nominee is litigated in public and the -- >> how do you avoid this? how do you do it? >> he's got to make a decision. obama has either got to nominate him when he gets back to washington tomorrow or mo
year's was in 1996. that is, of course, when they were dealing with the government shut down. politics will be put aside this morning. the president, a lot of members of congress will be attending that memorial service for the late senator. >> kristen welker in hawaii. we will check in with you again later in our show. >>> from the fiscal cliff to gun control nra executive vice president was on "meet the press" this morning and here is part of what he said. >> i don't understand why you can't just for a minute imagine that when that horrible monster tried to shoot his way into sandy hook school that if a good guy with a gun would have been there he might have been able to stop it. >> nbc news editor is with me in the studio. there were armed guards at columbine. >> we know the nra is going to dig in. nothing is going to change until the other side can show that it can win these kinds of arguments. we saw this with environmental regulations in the 70s. you saw this in the 90s with the assault weapons ban. i think a lot of democrats got spooked after the mid 90s because so many of them l
, but public policy makers, people who are in government need to look after public employees whether they're firefighters or teachers. and these kinds of weapons -- we're talking about urban situations as well. there's no argument, not a hunting argument, not a self-protection argument for this kind of weapon. and i think that's where the political debate is going to go shorply when it comes to assault weapons. >> if you go with lapierre about arming our teachers and schools, we should arm firefighters. where does it end? >> which no firefighters would want. and how are you supposed to check as well in a firefighter situation what the mental state of the person you're trying to rescue is? it makes no sense at all. and again, if you are leading, you're an executive in government you have to look at our employees as well. >> one of the things that struck me about the press conference and on meet the press, is the number of factual errors from lapierre. we're going to look at this and talk about it on the other side. >> killers, robbers, rapists, gang members, violent crime is increasing aga
branches of the government not willing to make the deal they know they have to make. everybody wants to play the blame game. this is about to put us over the edge. >> perry, i want to start with you. if perception is reality and the blame is going to matter to somebody, which side is it really going to matter to? ivities the blame is on both sides. what's driven this whole process is republicans are very opposed to -- just the republicans who will vote for any tax increase. we learned last week from the plan b vote. once we go over the cliff, republicans are ready for a tax cut, not an increase. right now that's what the big challenge is. >> chip, is that the biggest strategy here, get to the third and pass the third, the new congress comes in, boehner danger doesn't exist anymore, his speakership stays in place and grover norquist gives a thumbs up to up? >> i don't think that was the strategy a week ago. i think the speaker was trying to put the deal together, as we've seen the senate not -- i think that may become the strategy. i've always thought they would wait until the last ho
this is insanity and the threat to the economy is not a reasonable way to govern. >> mike, how -- again, not to oversimplify this thing, but how did we get here? i think most folks following this fairly closely assumed that as is the case with a lot of things in washington, d.c. that at the 11th hour withere will ba deal that gets done. there are a lot of folks involved in the deal making saying, it won't happen this time. >> well, look. i think ari is right in one real respect which is they set this up, you know, more than a year ago as a way of trying to provide counter pressure to the political pressures that exist across the board on all of these lawmakers and these individual districts. they thought that the pressure, the scare tactic that they put on themselves of deep defense cuts on the one side and deep cuts to domestic programs on the other side forces everybody to the table. it clearly turned out that in the wake of the election we had, the pressures in their districts, the threat of being primaried especially on the republican side meant that folks aren't willing to move as
the government down if you remember in 2011. they didn't care. the president compromised. we finally came up with a deal. when we came to the debt ceiling. and beginning to pay our bills. and continuing to pay our bills. they didn't really care. i think that's what they were set out to do. to close the government. we are in a season where we need to act. >> you, congressman -- >> on something concrete. >> i didn't mean to interrupt you there but it sounds like you think it's a deliberate attempt to take the economy, the government. >> yeah. 55. the tea party members. not john boehner. john boehner's allowed himself to be captured by the fellows. he is above and beyond that. i think he's basically trying to do the right thing but he can't get a vote out of his own party for his own legislation. who does he turn to? the president of the united states? more worried about getting a proposition from the president to turn down then what proposition is he talking about? i think the president has been more than willing to compromise and the democrats in the house of representatives. we need 30 votes
to see i increase my interest because these guys can't run a government, you're looking at going toward a recession where we're playing politics in washington. this is very serious. this is not just beltway rhetoric here. i think that people need to understand to the point of calling their congressional representative in outrage today saying, we should not be at this point. they're playing politics with the actual livelihood of families. this is not something that it will be all right a week or two or three or four. we start to go down that cliff, we don't know whether the momentum downward is going to be very, very damaging. >> yeah. >> maybe. >> you got na smirk on your face. >> maybe. i agree with the reverend that they're playing politics with livelihoods, because it is a huge risk. you're right about that. i disagree a little bit on the sort of dramatic, immediate impact of it. what we could get -- this is a possibility, and i'm trying to be optimistic because it's towards the end of the year. it's been crummy for a lot of people. we could get a deal the third week of january where
here that the federal government has emerged as one of the most potent factor driving income inequality. what do you mean? >> this has to do with the first story in the series, which is about tax equality. we did find the bush era tax cuts and sort of increased incomes at the top, that was a factor in reducing inequality, so it can be something that the government can do to mitigate. we tried to look at data in our series. we didn't want to be partisan about this. one factor that can help is tax policy, but the broader issue is jobs. people at the top are earning much more than they ever have. >> talks to that point about tax policy, the numbers out there, is it 250,000? is it 400,000? what is the threshold that would help to flatten this issue of income inquaet, be more progressive, perhaps? >> i think it would help to, at the top, to increase the rates. i think there's a need for training. we looked at two states along with washed. we looked at massachusetts and indiana. it's a skills economy. the manufacturing jobs where a high school graduate could sort of get a debt well-pays jobs
your bank that goes to the federal government. but you can go online and with free holiday shipping purchase a high capacity magazine. even the law enforcement in the communities have no way of know ing a large number of weapons, perhaps a bullet proof vest. that might send off a few alarms. making it harder to sexercise te right to vote. we should think that people are more responsible owning a gun than casting a ballot. that is part of what is being revealed. >> i want to go to one other finding in this study about this. it is about the notion of people need guns for protection. >> there is no evidence that a gun in the home reduces the likelihood of severe iity durin break in. it is actually going to be usable in a way that will protect you. >> to the contrary. those same studies have shown, they are are more likely to go through if there is a gun in the house. what is more likely to happen is you are going to get shot. what happened is, they didn't kill the shooter. the shooter killed themselves. they were in able to get to it. >> they looked at the mass events. if somebody had
. if they want to. they have the right to protect themselves. the government cannot protect us. they can't be everywhere all the time. the government has delusional thinking. >> it's such a complicating subject and i hate to play into the sound bite. we're 5% of the world's population and we've got 50% of the guns. >> you know, today i think the nra planted a flag on planet bizarro. i hate to use a sound bite like that. but we have more guns in this country and we have more gun violence in this country than any other western industrialized nation and they don't see a link and, in fact, what they then say is, we need more guns like our guest just said. that's the world we live in. we live in a world where everyone around the country has mentally deranged people, violent movie games, violent music as we do, and yet they don't have the number of guns we have and strikingly, oddly enough they don't have the same gun violence that we do. i don't know why that point escapes wayne lapierre. and our guest on the show tonight. >> mr. siebold, i feel naive. i'm confused. i expected the nra to embr
would only fund the government for eight days. >> the senate is set to reconvene sunday at 1:00 eastern time. the house expected to be in session sunday. are going to start around 2:00 with the first votes coming around 6:30 p.m. let's head on over to the white house. kristen welker standing by. a lot happening in washington, d.c. a lot happening i would assume at the white house. but how engaged is the presidented to in moving this thing forward? >> reporter: good afternoon, t.j. i am told there are conversations going on at the staff level. as you know, he met with congressional leaders here at the white house for about an hour on friday. now sources who are familiar with that conversation tell me that the president essentially said to lawmakers, you have two options. one, come up with a plan that can make its way through both chambers, or allow his proposal to go through a vote in both chambers. and that's what you heard the president referencing in that sound bite that you just aired, t.j. in the president's proposal it calls for extending the bush era tax cuts for those making $250
extremism. an interest group out of control, not a government. democrats, even red state democrats, take note, sandy hook put a face on unlimited gun rights and an nra run amok. it's time to stop being afraid of the nra. time to stop changing the subject when guns are brought up. you, democratic politicians, can run on common sense gun restrictions, and you can win. for the first time in decades, there is now a political price to be paid for gun extremism, and i have got an idea for your first commercial. did you happen to see wayne lapierre on "meet the press"? that does it for us on "the cycle." karen finney is in the chair for martin bashir and it is all yours. >> thanks, krystal. good afternoon. i'm karen finney in for martin bashir on this thursday, december 27th. the president is back in washington, the senate is working against the clock, and speaker boehner, yeah, he's m.i.a. >> no new negotiations are scheduled. >> congress has five days to strike a deal before the end of the year deadline. >> they're calling it the fiscal cliff. [ speaking foreign language ] >> john boehn
of combination of gun control and mental health initiatives on behalf of the government. a lot of the silence up until now has been blamed on the nra's political power. it's estimated in your own race in 2010, the nra and affiliates spent $1.5 million to outst you. how powerful are they really? i heard ed rendell say they are a paper tiger. are they really that powerful? does the sandy hook shooting do anything to change that? >> no, they are not that powerful. look, we came within two percentage points of that race and it had nothing too do with the nra. the nra opposed me in every single race and i won every single one until the very last. my take on this is that americans very much want their liberties to be respected. but we are americans that come together in a community and if we want more senators, senator casey recently changed his position and that's the tragedy about connecticut it took that tragedy to have senators to do what's actually right. the nra is not a complete paper tiger, just a special interest group, and i believe that americans want to do what's right for the community. t
to cut government spending. so while this is an important part, there are many chapters that are going to be happening over the next 24 hours, and we will see if they can get it done. the goal to have something ready to look at by sunday. >> thank you, kelly. my eyes did not glaze over, honestly. this has been a rough couple of weeks for john boehner and hard to believe he is the first casualty of the war. as kelly just said, boehner put forward the plan b only to withdraw it when he could not rustle up enough republican votes, and since then he is more of an observer than a player in the crisis. joining me is rob acosta, and "republic's" john stein. as we just heard from kelly o'donnell, they will be faced with needing democrats to get this deal through if we do indeed have a deal, and then he has to go back to the caucus and say, re-elect me as speaker. how does he do that? >> well, these are two separate questions, richard. on the first point, boehner has a tough time corralling some of the republican votes to vote for obama's plan. if the president brings the 250 plan to the house
. do we have 60 days? >> we do. the treasury can pursue extraordinary measures. it gives the government more money and will put off the actual kind of "d" day for the u.s. defaulting on its debt, only by a week or so. but, again, the real thing that should be scaring everybody is the thing that's coming in a couple of months. >> you know, we heard the president talking today about how mind boggling this is. you know, that normal people don't resolve their differences this way. i don't know how you can shuffle around money. that really is mind boggling. thank you. up next, the nra's response to gun violence? what else, more guns. the new battle over gun violence with chris matthews. you're watching "hardball" the place for politics. >> welcome back to hardball. the tragic school shooting has put renewed focus not just on the guns, but on school safety itself. >> i call on congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. and to do it now. >> but here's what it looks like when you run the numbers. sla
it in their paycheck and they will after january 1. the government will be taking more out of their paychecks and when the tax time will roll by in april, they'll feel it and businesses will feel it. once people will see they're losing money on this deal you'll see more public outrage about it. >> david naka, mura, calling for an up or down vote if the senate can't come up with it. he's talking about 250,000, at one point 400,000. is it realistic to think that the president can win this thing on an up or down vote? >> if they actually go to an up and down vote there will be a lot of pressure on those who were against a temporary fix with this to make their case known and actually go on the record. that's why the question is would the republican senators who would oppose this thing at the $250,000 level, they would use some of the mechanisms they have like the fill buster and things that the public doesn't like, but they're certainly part of the tools that the senators have to object to these things. would they block it? as mark murray said, this is about the blame game and setting up and if you'll blo
. it gives the government more money and will put off the actual kind of "d" day for the u.s. defaulting on its debt, only by a week or so. but, again, the real thing that should be scaring everybody is the thing that's coming in a couple of months. >> you know, we heard the president talking today about how mind boggling this is. you know, that normal people don't resolve their differences this way. i don't know how you can shuffle around money. that really is mind boggling. thank you. up next, the nra's response to gun violence? what else, more guns. the new battle over gun violence with chris matthews. you're watching "hardball" the place for politics. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i ca
budget cuts coming down to certainly state and local governments, not a good thing. and so this seemingly bad game of chicken, you know, this is not some schoolyard game here. this is about people's lives, it's about their livelihoods, it's about the future of cities, it's about programs that need the dollars to provide services that the citizens want and expect is lack of doing your job. and so congress, it seems to me, should be flying, literally, back into session to get things done. the marketplace will not reward this inactivity, but more importantly, the psychological confidence that citizens and the business community should have about the ability of congress and washington to actually get stuff done will, again, be shaken. it was mentioned, jonathan mentioned earlier, you mentioned earlier summer of 2011, a useless debate about whether or not we should raise the debt ceiling, had been done 36 times, but we had to have an inane debate about that. now it's the fiscal cliff. and whether or not across the board cuts should be made to all kinds of services and programs because the supe
norquist and his pledge? >> it's odd because grover was the one sort of outside government institution on the conservative side who agreed with speaker boehner's plan "b" which would have allowed taxes to go up above $1 million in income. all the other conservative groups say no. i think grover's pledge, i don't know where it goes from here. obviously is doesn't have as much teeth as is it did because there are people who are willing to buck it. >> i think the key thing with the grover pledge though is that republicans feel like they're in such a corner here, the house is in disarray, boehner doesn't really know where his caucus is going to go. they're not really worried about grover's pledge. they're more worried about rebuilding the party and surviving this horrible moment when they barely control one chamber. >> okay. so i want to run this by you. charles krauthammer from "the washington post" has suggested this kind of complicated theory that the president has a bigger plan here. wonder if we can play this tape of what he says the president's strategy is. >> he's been using this, a
's was 1996. that was during the government shutdown. this is really a rare occurrence for members of congress to have to come back and work out legislation that they went able to get done before the christmas holiday. >> the president is supposed to stay there for how long? >> well, of course, the white house not really giving us specifics about the president's travel plans at this point in time. the reality is i think the president is himself trying to figure out what he is going to do, but we do expect that he will cut his vacation short. you've heard the president himself during his press conference on friday say i will be seeing you all next week. i think that it is very likely that we will see president obama back in d.c. later on this week and also taking part in those negotiations. >> last but not least, do you have on flip-flops? >> no, not yet. >> i'm looking at wi kiki behind you, and i'm jealous. i have to say i think anybody that's seeing this all right now, we are all jealous. >> it is beautiful here. it's a great assignment. >> i know. happy holidays. thanks, kristen. >>> with t
they see their paycheck next year. it's almost certain that the government will not extend the payroll tax holiday. that means a 2% tax increase for every last one of us. joining me is gerald bernstein, a senior fellow at the center of budget and policy priorities. get the title out. let's get to business. why are we not talking about this? talking about the cliff, but everybody's taxes going up with the payroll tax holiday. >>ith a great question, t.j. an important and underappreciated part of the fiscal cliff. the answer to the why is it really doesn't have any champions. when you hear the list of things people fighting for, estate tax, you hear the unemployment extension, things like that. you don't even hear this listed anymore. i know for a fact that the white house was fighting for this. they understand how important it is to people's paychecks, but how important to the overall economy. actually $100 billion, taking out of the 2013 economy at a time when paychecks have been stagnant. an unfortunate loss. >> let's take a look at the rest of this deal. the payroll tax holiday. everybod
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